Judaism at Home: Passover

I’m really excited to kick off our Judaism at Home conversations on March 2! More than any other holiday, we prepare diligently for Passover. At […]

I’m really excited to kick off our Judaism at Home conversations on March 2! More than any other holiday, we prepare diligently for Passover. At the center of Passover are questions, and I hope that our conversations throughout the month of March (every Tuesday night!) will help answer (or lead to more of!) some of those questions.
Most of us are familiar with the Four Questions: Why do we only eat Matzah, Why do we eat Maror, Why do we dip twice, Why do we recline? And those are just the beginning.

The Haggadah, our guide book through the Seder Meal is absolutely loaded with questions. It is fitting; we are a people of questions. Just read the Talmud- it’s a conversation of answering questions with questions and questioning the question. Complicated, n-est-ce pas?

But even before we sit down for the Seder, our Passover night re-enactment of our ancestors’ flight to freedom, we have tons of questions. What is Chametz? Why do we need to get rid of that Chametz? Can I eat rice? Do I need new dog food? Is canola oil really off-limits? What are kitniyot anyway?

Passover inches closer, and we need to start thinking about the Seder. What should I cook? I have a vegetarian son and a vegan niece, and I would rather not have a shankbone on the seder plate; can I substitute something? What even goes on a seder plate and why? Do we have to read every word of the Haggadah? Oh, and what Haggadah should I use? And where can I get copies of it online to share with my guests attending remotely?

When do we eat?!? Are there parts that are more important? How do I get people to discuss the story and share their thoughts? How do we make the Seder more than a dinner party? Now that we finished the Seder(s), what next? A week of matzah and leftover Charoset? Or more deep thinking about what Passover means to us (I hope the latter)?

Whew, my question mark key is starting to stick. So come any or all of the Passover conversations starting Tuesday, March 2 at 7:30. Bring your favorite beverage and let’s tawk!